X
Online paper help for college

Substance Abuse Studies & Reports – General

Smoking, Alcohol & Other Substance Abuse Among Middle and High School Kids in California

NAPAFASA has created a PowerPoint that illustrates the results from a 2005-2006 California Health Kids Survey on smoking, alcohol and other substance abuse among middle and high school kids in Callifornia.

Please visit this link for the PowerPoint Presentation.

Monitoring the Future - 2005

Monitoring the Future is an ongoing study of the behaviors, attitudes, and values of American secondary school students, college students, and young adults. Each year, a total of approximately 50,000 8th, 10th and 12th grade students are surveyed (12th graders since 1975, and 8th and 10th graders since 1991). In addition, annual follow-up questionnaires are mailed to a sample of each graduating class for a number of years after their initial participation.

The newly released 2005 results can be found here.

The general Monitoring the Future website is www.monitoringthefuture.org.

Bachman, J., Cooper, S., Johnston, L., O'Malley, P., Schulenberg, J., & Wallace, J. (2002). Tobacco, Alcohol, and Illicit Drug Use: Racial and Ethnic Differences Among U.S. High School Seniors, 1976-2000. Public Health Reports, 117.

Examines the differences in adolescents' use of tobacco, alcohol, and illicit drug use by racial and ethnic groups based on a questionnaire from a large nationally representative sample of U.S. high school seniors. Among the findings are that significant differences exist in adolescent use of tobacco, alcohol, and illicit drugs by racial and ethnic groups, and these differences have changed over time.

Subscriptions to Public Health Reports* can be made online at phr.oupjournals.org or at the Elservier website atwww.elsevier.com/wps/find/journalbibliographicinfo.cws_home/703066/description?navopenmenu=1. Available at the Los Angeles office NAPAFASA resource library.

Beauvais, F., Belgrave, F., Buka, S., Estrada, A., Galea, S., Iguchi, M., et al. (2002). Drug Use, HIV/AIDS, and Health Outcomes Among Racial and Ethnic Populations. Public Health Reports, 117.

Presents articles derived from a workshop examining health disparities among drug users in racial and ethnic populations. It reports on results of research supported by the National Institute on Drug Abuse, describes innovative programs being implemented, and synthesizes the current literature on various topics in the field.

Subscriptions to Public Health Reports* can be made online at phr.oupjournals.org or at the Elservier website atwww.elsevier.com/wps/find/journalbibliographicinfo.cws_home/703066/description?navopenmenu=1. Available at the Los Angeles office NAPAFASA resource library.

Brown, J. M., Council, C. L., Penne, M. A., Gfroerer, J. C. (2005). Immigrants and Substance Use: Findings from the 1999-2001 National Survey on Drug Use and Health. (DHHS Publication No. SMA 04-3909, Analytic Series A-23). Rockville, MD: Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration, Office of Applied Studies.

This report presents information on the prevalence of alcohol, tobacco, and illicit drug use among immigrants aged 18 or older in the United States during 1999-2001. The report is organized by immigrant groups from similar background but also provides disaggregated data for several specific ethnicities. Immigrants from the following Asian countries were included in the analysis: Japan, Korea, Philippines, China, Vietnam, and India.

Available at www.drugabusestatistics.samhsa.gov/immigrants/immigrants.pdf.

Buka, S. (2002). Disparities in Health Status and Substance Use: Ethnicity and Socioeconomic Factors. Public Health Reports, 117.

Reviews the literature on racial, ethnic, and socioeconomic disparities in morbidity and mortality, focusing on substance use and abuse. Among the conclusions are that racial and ethnic differences in health and health behaviors are likely to be by socioeconomic differences, cultural factors, and prejudice and discrimination, both institutional and individual.

Subscriptions to Public Health Reports* can be made online at phr.oupjournals.org or at the Elservier website atwww.elsevier.com/wps/find/journalbibliographicinfo.cws_home/703066/description?navopenmenu=1. Available at the Los Angeles office NAPAFASA resource library.

Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Youth Risk Behavior Surveillance - United States, 2003. May 21, 2004. MMWR 2004:53 (No. SS-2).

The Youth Risk Behavior Surveillance System (YRBSS) monitors six categories of priority health-risk behaviors among youth and young adults - behaviors that contribute to unintentional injuries and violence; tobacco use; alcohol and other drug use; sexual behaviors that contribute to unintended pregnancy and sexually transmitted diseases (STDs), including human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection; unhealthy dietary behaviors; and physical inactivity - plus overweight. YRBSS includes a national school-based survey conducted by CDC as well as state and local school-based surveys conducted by education and health agencies. This report summarizes results from the national survey, 32 state surveys, and 18 local surveys conducted among students in grades 9-12 from February through December 2003.

This publication is available online at www.cdc.gov/HealthyYouth/yrbs/index.htm. Available at the Los Angeles office NAPAFASA resource library.

Johnston, L. D., O'Malley, P. M., Bachman, J. G., & Schulenberg, J. E. (2003).Monitoring the Future: National Survey Results on Drug Use, 1975-2003: Volume I, Secondary school students. (NIH Publication No. 04-5507). Bethesda, MD: National Institute on Drug Abuse.

Monitoring the Future is an ongoing study of the behaviors, attitudes, and values of American secondary school students, college students, and young adults. Each year, a total of some 50,000 8th, 10th and 12th grade students are surveyed (12th graders since 1975, and 8th and 10th graders since 1991). In addition, annual follow-up questionnaires are mailed to a sample of each graduating class for a number of years after their initial participation.

This publication is available online atwww.monitoringthefuture.org/pubs/monographs/vol1_2003.pdf.

Ma, G. X. & Henderson, G., eds. (2002). Ethnicity and Substance Abuse. Charles C. Thomas Publisher, LTD.

This book offers an interdisciplinary approach to understanding drug abuse problems within the U.S. ethnic minority community, including African American, Asian Pacific American, Hispanics, and Native Americans.

The three main objectives of this book are: (1) to make care providers aware of cultural factors that affect substance abuse and cessation; (2) to review multidisciplinary research studies in order to ascertain helpful and unhelpful health care practices; and (3) to provide practical suggestions for improving community-wide substance prevention and intervention programs.

Chapters specifically devoted to Asian Pacific Islander Americans include:

  • Substance Abuse Among Southeast Asians in the U.S.: Implications for Practice and Research
  • Treating Southeast Asian Immigrants: Miem Opium Users in California
  • Smoking Prevention and Intervention in Asian American Communities: A Case Study

Available at the Los Angeles office NAPAFASA resource library.

Partnership for a Drug Free America. (2000). Inhalant Abuse Research Report.New York: Partnership for a Drug Free America.

The goal of this study is to update understanding and knowledge of inhalant abuse among adolescents through 810 personal interviews in 31 geographically dispersed markets. Particularly, the study asks if there is still a need to inform youth and parents of risks associated with inhalant abuse and looking at differences in attitudes and understanding on inhalant abuse by race and ethnicity.

Available at the Los Angeles office NAPAFASA resource library.

Schwartz, W. (1997). Smoking Prevention Strategies for Urban and Minority Youth. ERIC Clearinghouse on Urban Education: New York.

Adolescents living in disadvantaged urban areas suffer from many of the stresses shown to increase tobacco use. Most strategies developed for anti-tobacco campaigns are most effective with white, middle-class adolescents. This digest discusses various initiatives being taken to create new prevention strategies specifically targeting urban and minority youths.

This digest is available at www.ericdigests.org/1998-1/smoking.htm.